Acting for Film Concentration

The BA or Certificate in Acting for Film Concentration provides thorough, rigorous training designed to develop students’ individual talent and provide the tools, experience and discipline necessary for a successful film acting career.

Through an integrated, project-based curriculum, students expand their emotional range and achieve the ability to communicate truthfully within a scene. Over the course of the program students acquire the real-world experience and professional technique needed to perform at the highest artistic level while negotiating the technical demands and logistical concerns of a film shoot. 

Acting For Film is offered as a Certificate, or as a Completion BA Degree. 

(Central Washington University, in partnership with SFI, also offers a BA degree in combination with our Acting for Film Concentration.)

 

Program Highlights

Acting for Film Auditions

Succeed As A Film Actor!

 

Accelerated BA and MFA Degrees!  
 

Tuition Grants Available!

 

Seattle Film Institute (SFI) is proud to announce that the Washington Student Achievement Council (WSAC) has approved the school’s Acting in Film concentration as an addition to both SFI’s Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Film Program, and its Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Filmmaking and Producing Program.  SFI is the only school offering this baccalaureate and graduate curriculum in the Pacific Northwest region. SFI’s programs provide an accelerated pathway to a BA or MFA degree. 

The Seattle Film Institute Acting for Film Program provides thorough, rigorous training designed to develop the student's individual talent and provide the tools, experience and discipline necessary for a successful film acting career

 

Through an integrated, project-based curriculum, students expand their emotional range and achieve the ability to communicate truthfully within a scene. Over the course of the program, students acquire the real-world experience and professional technique needed to perform at the highest artistic level while negotiating the technical demands and logistical concerns of a film shoot.

 

While still enrolled as a student in the Acting for Film Program at SFI Brian “Stewie” Giron was cast in Better Than Love, a Hollywood production shot in the Seattle area. “This was my first professional audition,” Stewie says. “I was actually more excited than nervous.  The work we did in the program gave me the confidence I needed — I knew what to expect and how to handle myself.  I focused on the reading, using the skills I developed at SFI. The reading went great and getting cast for the first time in a professional film is phenomenal.”

 

Accelerated BA Option

Students who come to SFI with an Associate of Arts Transfer Degree (or its equivalent) earn a BA in Film with a Concentration in Acting For Film immediately upon successful completion of SFI’s 50 week program.  

Students without an Associate of Arts Transfer Degree (or its equivalent) receive a certificate from Seattle Film Institute upon successful completion of the program. This certificate recognizes and acknowledges that the student has earned 90 college-level credits at Seattle Film Institute.  Students who wish to continue their education after receiving the certificate can complete their general education credits and electives at the accredited community college, college, or university of their choice (either on-campus or online).  Upon completion of these credits, students receive a BA in Film with a Concentration in Acting For Film from SFI.

 

Accelerated MFA Option

Students who already have their Bachelors Degree can take the SFI Acting For Film Program as year 1 of the two-year MFA in Filmmaking and Producing Program.  In year 2 students take the Producing for Film curriculum which gives them the ability to take charge of their careers and initiate, coordinate, supervise and control all the aspects of a film production including creative, business, management, and marketing, distribution and sales.  Students graduate with a Master of Fine Arts in Filmmaking and Producing with a Concentration in Acting For Film.

 

Substantial tuition grant support is

available for the Fall 2016 session.

Grants will be awarded on the basis of interview and audition.  Auditions will be held at the Seattle Film Institute - 3210 16th Ave W.  Seattle, WA  98119  (map: http://seattlefilminstitute.com/new_interbay_location_seattle_film_institute  )

 

To schedule your audition appointment, contact Chris Blanchett at 206.568.4387 or chris@seattlefilminstitute.com

 

Program highlights:

Students graduate with:

Acting for Film Curriculum

 

Required Core Classes: 30 Credits:

CSFA-301 Language of Film (5 credits) 
PROD-321 Production 1 (5 credits)
PROD-341 Fundamentals of Editing (5 credits)
PROD-463 Capstone Project (5 credits)
PROD-489 Professional Practices (5 credits)
PROD-499 Special Topics (5 credits)

 

Acting for Film Classes: 60 Credits

ACTF-321 Basic Acting I (5 credits) 
ACTF-322 Acting for Camera I (5 credits)
ACTF-331 Voice and Speech I (3 credits) 
ACTF-332 
Voice and Speech II (3 credits)
ACTF-341 Movement I (2 credits)
ACTF-342 Movement II (2 credits)
ACTF-351 Introduction to Improvisation (5 credits) 
ACTF-355 Intermediate Improvisation (2 credits)
ACTF-357 Voiceover Fundamentals (3 credits)
ACTF-359 Combat for Film Fundamentals (2 credits)
ACTF-361 Introduction to Text Analysis (5 credits) 
ACTF-371 Auditions I (3 credits)
ACTF-423 Acting for Camera II (5 credits)
ACTF-424 Acting for Camera III (5 credits)
ACTF-425 Acting for Television and Commercials (2 credits) 
ACTF-433 Voice and Speech III (3 credits)
ACTF-443 Movement III (2 credits)
ACTF-472 Auditions II (3 credits)

ACTF—321: Basic Acting 1 (5)

Basic Acting 1 provides an introduction to the theory and practice of acting craft, development of the actor’s tools, basic acting techniques, including pantomime, vocal conditioning, improvisation, and scene study.

ACTF—322: Acting for Camera 1 (5)

Acting for Camera 1 provides an introduction to the study and technique of acting for the camera. Through the use of film, TV, and commercial scripts, students are introduced to basic camera technique and terminology.

ACTF—331: Voice and Speech 1 (3)

Voice and Speech 1 provides an introductory study of speech and voice regarding text, context, environment, dynamics, range, and accent.

ACTF—332: Voice and Speech 2 (3)

Voice and Speech 2 focuses on building on basic skills in the study of speech and voice regarding text, context, environment, dynamics, range, and accent..

ACTF—341: Movement 1 (2)

Movement 1 introduces the practice of various movement disciplines such as Laban, Suziki, Feldenkrais, Chekhov, Lessac, and Alexander, to enhance flexibility and expressiveness of the actor’s body in a variety of performance applications.

ACTF—342: Movement 2 (2)

Movement 2 develops and builds on the practice of various movement disciplines, such as Laban, Suziki, Feldenkrais, Chekhov, Lessac, and Alexander, to enhance flexibility and expressiveness of the actor’s body in a variety of performance applications.

ACTF—351: Introduction to Improvisation (5)

Introduction to Improvisation introduces the student to improvisational techniques with a particular emphasis on the use of the games as a stimulus for spontaneity, strong playing relationships and trouble shooting within the rehearsal process.

ACTF—355: Intermediate Improvisation (2)

Intermediate Improvisation pays particular attention to the nuances of scenic improvisation. Students learn to look for connections and patterns that give the scenes depth. Topics covered include: emotional and status initiations; finding the internal and external game of a scene; and narrative pacing and resolution.

ACTF—357: Voiceover Fundamentals (3)

Voiceover Fundamentals provides an introduction to basic voiceover skills and techniques with particular attention to animation and narrative work.

ACTF—359: Fundamentals of Combat for Film (2)

Fundamentals of Combat for Film provides the fundamentals of hand-to-hand combat and weaponry with a focus on developing skills safely and effectively for film and television.
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ACTF—361: Introduction to Text Analysis (5)

Introduction to Text Analysis develops the skills necessary for the analysis and interpretation of scripts from a variety of perspectives as the basis for performance from the viewpoints of both viewers and practitioners.

ACTF—371: Auditions 1 (3)

Auditions 1 focuses on the exploration and practice of techniques for professional camera auditions with an emphasis on preparing for cold readings.

ACTF—423: Acting for Camera 2 (5)

Acting for Camera 2 focuses on scene-work for the camera with specific attention to camera awareness and blocking in relationship to hitting marks and framing.

ACTF—424: Acting for Camera 3 (5)

Acting for Camera 3 develops advanced technical knowledge of acting for the camera with an emphasis on continuity and the importance of matching the action between master shots, close-ups and re-takes. Acting students will collaborate with student directors and cinematographers from the filmmaking programs.

ACTF—425: Acting for Televison and Commercials (2)

Acting for Television and Commercials prepares students for a wide variety of television shows and commercials. This course provides a discussion of technical terms, scoring copy, and basic guidelines for interpretation.

ACTF—433: Voice and Speech 3 (3)

Voice & Speech 3 focuses on advanced skills in the study of speech and voice regarding text, context, environment, dynamics, range, and accent.

ACTF—443: Movement 3 (2)

Movement III provides advanced study in movement disciplines such as Alexander, Fekdenkrais, Suzuki, and Rasaboxes.

ACTF—472: Auditions 2 (3)

Auditions 2 provides preparation for entry into the professional community as students work to advance their audition skills by in-class work and out-of-class activity. 

 

Professional Development Opportunities

More info Coming Soon!